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The 6 Best Stove Fans to Efficiently Heat Your Space

best stove fans guide
(Image credit: Amazon)

Owning one of the best stove fans is a great way to ensure your space will benefit from the heat being given off by your stove.

Log burning stoves, along with multi-fuel, gas and pellet stoves are great at heating the area directly in front or around them, but are less effective at projecting that heat further into the room, potentially leaving you with spots that are either too hot or too cold. 

To properly heat the entire room, you’re going to need a stove fan. They sit on top of the stove and circulate the warm air, distributing it evenly around the space. And because they are powered by the heat generated by the stove, they require no power source.

If this sounds like a no-brainer to you, read our picks of the best stove fans around to help you decide on a model.

Best Stove Fans

LUMAMU 5 Blade Stove Fan

(Image credit: Amazon)

1. LUMAMU 5 Blade Stove Fan

The best stove fan: eye-catching and highly efficient

Specifications

Dimensions: ‎21.9 x 20 x 13.9cm
Weight: 980g
Min. operating temperature: 50°C
Max. operating temperature: 340°C
Noise level: 25dB
Airflow range: 380 CFM
Magnetic: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Brilliant airflow range
+
Stylish design
+
Quiet operation
+
Magnetic thermometer included

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey

This premium stove fan initially stands out for its eye-catching gold design but it's also packed with several worthwhile features. 

This fan boasts an almighty 380 CFM when it comes to airflow - the highest on this list. It's also a near silent operation, and it comes complete with a magnetic thermometer as well as a temperature protection device.

This model is designed to be as much of a focal point as the stove itself, which may be a downside if you're looking for a stove fan to blend in visually with your stove.


Tomersun 4 Blades Stove Fan

(Image credit: Amazon)

2. Tomersun 4 Blades Stove Fan

A compact stove fan ideal for limited spaces

Specifications

Dimensions: ‎16 x 12 x 21cm
Weight: ‎650g
Min. operating temperature: 55°C
Max. operating temperature: 350°C
Noise level: 25dB
Airflow range: 150-180 CFM
Magneic: No

Reasons to buy

+
Compact
+
Lightweight
+
Quiet operation

Reasons to avoid

-
Lower airflow range than some models on this list

This is an excellent, compact stove fan that would be ideal for those with small stoves with limited space above — for example those placed in an alcove. 

As with all the stove fans listed here, no batteries are required for it to operate — it simply kicks in once the stove reaches 55°C and switches off once it reaches 350°C, getting slower or faster as required. Operation is quiet and the design is discreet. 

One negative of the compact size of this fan is has a lower airflow range than some of the models on this list, which could be an issue in larger spaces but should not be a problem for those with smaller rooms. 

If you want a thermometer you will need to buy one separately.


NETTA 4 Blade Woodburner Stove Fan

(Image credit: Amazon)

3. NETTA 4 Blade Woodburner Stove Fan

The best stove fan for a near silent operation

Specifications

Dimensions: 20.5 x 17 x 10cm
Weight: ‎810g
Min. operating temperature: 50°C
Max. operating temperature: 350°C
Noise level: 'Silent'
Airflow range: Unspecified
Magnetic: No

Reasons to buy

+
Very, very quiet
+
Simple, unobtrusive design

Reasons to avoid

-
Not magnetic

This sleek stove fan is immediately impressive for how quiet it is even when operating at full speed. It's not exactly 'silent' as the manufacturers describe, but it's very, very quiet — an important point if you don't want your cosy evenings in front of the fire ruined by loud whirring noises. 

Heat distribution is even and although not 'compact', neither is this fan too large.

The only real downside is that this is not a magnetic fan and there is no temperature gauge included. 


Vonhaus 4 Blade Stove Fan with Temperature Gauge

(Image credit: Vonhaus)

4. Vonhaus 4 Blade Stove Fan with Temperature Gauge

Handy temperature gauge included

Specifications

Dimensions: 20.4 x 18 x 10.9cm
Weight: 660g
Min. operating temperature: 50°C
Max. operating temperature: 300°C
Noise level: Unspecified
Airflow range: 180 CFM
Magnetic: No

Reasons to buy

+
Temperature gauge included
+
Smart design
+
Cost effective
+
Good heat distribution

Reasons to avoid

-
Slight noise on operation

A basic, yet highly effective stove fan. While it has no magnetic base, this fan does come complete with a very accurate temperature gauge — making it a great buy for its very reasonable price. 

Some users reported a slight humming when it is operating at full pelt but its highly efficient heat distribution capabilities make up for this. 

The design of the fan is unfussy and would blend in with any interior scheme and with a range of stove styles. 


Migaven Flue Pipe Stove Fan

(Image credit: Amazon)

5. Migaven Flue Pipe Stove Fan

A compact fan for contemporary stoves

Specifications

Dimensions: 13.5 x 13.5 x 16cm
Weight: Unspecified
Min. operating temperature: 55°C
Max. operating temperature: 350°C
Noise level: 35dB
Airflow range: 160-210 CFM

Reasons to buy

+
Thermometer included
+
Good airflow range
+
Fits to flue pipe to keep stove top clear

Reasons to avoid

-
Slightly expensive

This is a great stove fan for those who would prefer to keep the top of their stove clear of clutter. It is also a brilliant option for contemporary freestanding stoves or designed with sloped forms.

While it is more expensive than some of the other models out there, its airflow range is highly impressive — meaning you will use less fuel for burning in your stove. 


VOYTO Mini 4 Blade Heat Powered Stove Fan

(Image credit: Amazon)

6. VOYTO Mini 4 Blade Heat Powered Stove Fan

Suitable for a variety of stoves

Specifications

Dimensions: ‎13.5 x 11 x 14.5cm
Weight: 680g
Min. operating temperature: 50°C
Max. operating temperature: 345°C
Noise level: Unspecified
Airflow range: Unspecified

Reasons to buy

+
Compact
+
Lightweight
+
Quiet operation
+
Can be used on gas stoves as well as log and multi-fuel

Reasons to avoid

-
No thermometer and not magnetic

Billed as the 'smallest stove fan on the market' this is the ideal product for those with compact stoves or small spaces who still want to ensure good heat distribution and that their fan is working at maximum efficiency. 

The fan boasts quiet operation and has been used successfully on log burners, multi-fuel and gas stoves.  


How to Choose a Stove Fan

When choosing a stove fan that will be right for your home, you need to take into consideration how much space you have above your stove and how big the room your stove is located in is. 

Airflow Range

Bigger rooms require stove fans with greater air-moving capacities — something measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM). Therefore, stove fans with a higher CFM will mean you will use less fuel for burning in your stove. 

Magnetic

Fans with a magnetic base 'stick' to the stove via a clamp that fits onto your flue pipe instead of sitting flat on the stovetop. This is a feature that can be very useful if your stove is slightly sloping or has an irregular surface.

Temperature gauge

A temperature gauge is an energy-efficienct features which lets you monitor the heat and performance of your stove fan. You can use it to optimise its efficiency which will prevent against damage from overheating. 

Blades

Stove fans vary in the number of blades they possess, but a 4-blade fan is widely considered to be very effective. 

How Do Stove Fans Work?

Stove fans are powered using electricity that is generated from the heat given off by the stove they sit on or above. No electricity source or batteries are required. Moat models contain a  thermoelectric module that acts as a small generator, powering the fan’s motor. 

Stove fans usually begin operation once a certain temperature is reached (commonly 50°C-55°C), speeding up and slowing down according to the temperature thereon in. 

Jack has worked in journalism for 11 years and is the News Editor for Homebuilding & Renovating, a role he has had since 2019. He strives to break the most relevant and beneficial stories for self builders, extenders and renovators, including the latest news on the construction materials shortage and hydrogen heating. In 2021 he appeared on BBC's The World at One to discuss the government's planning reforms. 


He enjoys testing new tools and gadgets, and having bought his first home in 2013, he has renovated every room and recently finished a garden renovation.