Over the years we’ve featured quite a number of renovation and extension schemes designed by David Nossiter Architects in Homebuilding & Renovating magazine. The practice has always been one we’ve liked (hence the reason we’ve featured it on more than one occasion, including within the last year!). With this mind, it was truly time to bring their work to the world of homebuilding.co.uk — scroll through these images and you’ll find some great examples of the practice’s work in recent years.

Contemporary Extension to a Victorian Home, Colchester

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When the owners of this Victorian home in a Colchester Conservation Area wanted to add an extension and landscape their steep garden – while also creating a strong visual connection between the two – they knew a contemporary design would provide the space they required without looking pastiche.

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Impressed by his previous projects, the owners approached David with their brief. A white, cube-like single storey extension – replacing a glass lean-to – and terraced landscaping scheme was the response. The existing rear wall would be opened up to create a large kitchen/diner, while the former small kitchen would become a utility.

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To overcome the challenge of connecting the contemporary extension with the existing rich red brick walls, David designed in a band of frameless glazing. This would not only bring natural light deep into the new kitchen/diner, but provide opportunity to create a feature window seat inside.

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The garden’s topography has now come into its own through the scheme. The new patio is on a level threshold with the extension, but a series of rendered walls – flanking central steps – draw the eye up towards a south-facing, raised sun terrace. Here, a lawn, decking and cedar fences offer a softer aesthetic. Complementing this, David specified a sedum roof to cover the extension, offering continuous green views from the first floor windows.

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Photographer: Steve Lancefield

Barn Renovation, Oxfordshire

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This 18th century aisled framed barn was converted into a dwelling 50 years ago, but was in desperate need of modernisation. David Nossiter Architects were asked to produce a contemporary design without compromising the rural setting and structure of the original barn. More specifically, it was to be a working home that could evolve with the family.

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An eight-metre-high galleried hallway lies at the heart of the building, with all bedrooms on the first floor being accessed by a gallery landing. The master bedroom and ensuite bathroom, with family proportioned bath, slot between and around the massive oak framed structure. Ceilings reach to the apex of the roof, celebrating the proportions of the original barn. Full-height windows slide open on both levels, which can be pulled open on summer evenings, giving striking views.

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Photographer: Lyndon Douglas

Glazed Extension, Hertfordshire

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From the front this Victorian terrace – which lies within a Conservation Area – remains largely unchanged. The rear of the property, however, now features a striking glazed extension, providing room for a contemporary kitchen, dining and living rooms, and views out to the garden beyond.

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The extension has been constructed using a glazed screen that runs between existing party walls, with a flat roof and glazed rooflights above. At ground level, there is a level threshold between the indoor and outdoor spaces. These areas are further linked by the uninterrupted concrete worktop that runs the length of the extension and emerges into the garden where, in addition to cleverly concealing a cat flap, it is used as a barbecue and for seating. The whole of the worktop is beautifully lit from above by rooflights, equal in width to the worktop.

Photographer: Steve Lancefield

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