I am looking to buy a two bed detached bungalow on greenbelt land. I understand under the new permitted development rights I could build a extension out the back of the property upto 8m and a side extension no more than 50% of the house original width but can I do this on both sides of the House? I.e. build on 3 sides of the property? I know it cannot be In front of the original dwelling nor near any boundaries but it is a 3 acre plot with tiny original dwelling so would like to build the maximum allowed. Thank you

Comments
  • Lindsey Davis

    Hi Emma,

    Firstly it is worth noting that the new PD Rights regarding to larger extensions (6-8m instead of 3-4m) are only valid until 2016. Also, you will still require to give prior notification if you are planning to extend up to 8m on the rear, so there is a chance of refusal.

    These larger extensions can only be single storey (or ground floor room only but with eaves height of up to 4m – for example a single storey extension with vaulted ceiling or similar look).

    The existing rules still apply for other factors. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/permitted-development-rights-guide/

    Side extensions can only be single storey, max height of 4m and no wider than half of the original building. Doing it on both sides would be unlikely to fit under the overall 15% volume increase I’d have thought, especially if you want a sizeable rear extension. Extensions should also not result in more than half the garden being built upon.

    Maximum build size will depend on the size of the existing building, not really the plot size (although that does partly come into play with the garden coverage issue). And, remember that if the house has already been extended, then whatever has been added to it since 1948 will take up some of its PD allocation.

    Finally, it is all irrelevant if you are in a Conservation Area – you will need planning if you are.

    Lindsey

  • Emma Beckwith

    Thank you Lindsey, I haven’t seen anything under permitted development info regarding 15% volume increase. Do you anything else you could tell me about this please? As if this is the case even the back extension if it were to go out 8m would probably go over this as the original bungalow is only around 10m length and 10m depth

  • Emma Beckwith

    Hi again, I have just seen that the 15% volume increase rule is only for Wales and Ireland. We are in surrey England so don’t think we will have this rule, therefore do you think under permitted development I could build on 3 sides of the property? It is not a conservation area but is greenbelt. Looking though the previous q&a lots of people are unclear on the advice on this. When I speak to the council they never sound like they are sure either! Thanks for any answers

  • Lindsey Davis

    Hi Emma,

    Sorry I misread our info too. Yes, you’re right, 15% is only England and NI. Scotland is 24%. We used to have a percentage in England but not anymore.

    You can increase as much as you want within the size limits for each extension (each is treated as individual). So, you should be able to do both sides (as long as each is not over half the width), and the rear. These are single storey extensions only though of course.

    I have just found this brill interactive guide to help you visualise: http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/extensions/miniguide

    So yes, the only restriction is still the coverage of the garden. So you can’t cover more than 50% of the garden with extensions, existing extensions and outbuildings(including sheds!). So when calculating the size of your extension, factor in provision for any sheds you might want too.

    PD has had a few updates in the last few years, partly to relax the process for people wanting to extend, but it does make it hard to keep up.

    Lindsey

  • kate obrien

    Hi, I want to build a 2 storey rear extension on permitted development the house is detached and the extension is to be 3m wide. We have 12.4m to the rear boundary but only 1m between the house and the side boundaries. I want to know if I can build the ground floor extension only leaving 1m either side as the eaves here will be less than 3m and the first floor staggered in at the sides leaving the 2m gap required where the eaves are higher than 3m or do I have to bring the ground floor level inline with the first floor therefore loosing a meter on each side of the ground floor as well?

  • […] convert a loft space, add an outbuilding or improve their homes, for instance, work may fall under Permitted Development (PD), meaning a formal planning application is not needed. PD may also allow for the conversion of […]

  • Post a comment
    You must be logged in to comment. Log in

The fight to generate a useable instrument for Permitted Development looks like it is about to end with a reasonable result for all. After a ‘Ping Pong’ of proposals and amendments between the House of Commons and the House of Lords the end is nigh. On 25th April the Growth and Infrastructure Bill was granted Royal Assent and became the Growth and Infrastructure Act 2013.

The proposal to double the current Permitted Development Lengths of Extensions is likely to come into force shortly with some common sense restrictions. They will not be applicable in Conservation Areas (though the current PD rights for Conservation areas remain) and the Local Council will still be able to introduce Article 4 Directions (the removal of PD rights for a particular property) but they will allow development significantly larger than is currently permitted.

In essence a home owner wishing to build an extension will write to the local planning authority providing plans and a written description of the proposal. The local authority will then notify the adjoining neighbours – for example, the owners or occupiers of properties that share a boundary, including those at the rear. Those neighbours will have 21 days in which to make an objection, the same period as under existing planning rules. If no neighbours object, the home owner will be able to proceed. If any neighbour raises an objection, the local authority will then consider whether the impact of the proposed extension on the amenity of neighbours is acceptable. No planning fee will be levied on the home owner making the notification and if approval is not given, the home owner will be able to appeal against a refusal, or may wish to submit a full planning application. As with normal planning consents, neighbours will not be able to appeal against a grant of permission.

In summary if you wish to extend within the limits of the proposed PD Rights and your neighbours do not object you will be free to do so after giving them 21 days to object.

This will no doubt be introduced as a new Statutory Instrument in the coming weeks or months.

It’s a good result but homeowners still need to think about ensuring their neighbours retain their ‘right to light’ as this might yet scupper the most ambitious plans and simply getting the go ahead in 21 days will mean there will be many homeowners that are tempted take short cuts and construct without full Building Control pre-approval. Go there at your peril as the Building Control requirements to build ever greener homes means that the Builder that builds ‘the same extension he built last year will fall short of these new standards.

Stephen Green is a Partner at Holland and Green Architectural Design – An Architectural Design Practice that specialises in Extensions and Loft Conversions and are recognised as being leaders in PD rights understanding.

Comments
  • […] convert a loft space, add an outbuilding or improve their homes, for instance, work may fall under Permitted Development (PD), meaning a formal planning application is not needed. PD may also allow for the conversion of […]

  • Post a comment
    You must be logged in to comment. Log in