We are in the process of buying a 1920’s bungalow with the view to building a second storey on top of it & renovating the downstairs. The plan is to end up with a 4 double bedroom house.

As we are not allowed to dig the holes to check out the foundations until it is ours we don’t know yet if this is feasible or if it would be better to knock the whole thing down and re-build. We have been advised that planning permission shouldn’t be a problem as it is the only bungalow in a road of 2 storey houses, and it backs onto a railway line so no overlooking issues.

I have been doing lots of reading about timber frame and wonder if it possible to build the extension in timber frame on top of the existing solid walls?

Has anyone else done a similar project? How did you go about it?

Any idea on costs? Are we still looking at approx £1000 per square metre for this sort of project? We are on a fairly tight budget but are loking at fairly standard design, and are looking at cost saving wherever possible, we also want it to be as eco-friendly/energy saving as possible given our budget restraints.

Any other top tips? We have never done anything like this before and are total novices, and articles/info on this particular sort of project are really tough to come by!

Any help/advice would be much appreciated.

Comments
  • Anonymous

    Our experience is that a knock down and rebuild is the cheapest option. We are three months into our build which sounds similar to yours. We started out planning to add a first floor to an existing bugalow in a rural location. Build costs for the addition of the first floor and amendment to the floor plan were quoted at the same costs as we are going to end up with for a complete knock down and rebuild. We are hoping to bring the cost in at around

  • Anonymous

    Love your blog, it is great to see the whole process – although it scares me a little to see the magnitude of the kind of thing we are potentially taking on – in real pics! We are really keen to keep the existing structure as it has alot of character which we want to retain, but until we can actually get the plans drawn up/costed we can’t really say if we will be better off to start from scratch as you have. We are aiming towards a budget of

  • Anonymous

    Would like to hear how you have progressed with this. We want to build on top as well as extend to the boundary on the bottom to turn our 3 bed 850sqft bungalow into something more substantial. Renovation costs to get it to the state it is in now were 30k so I am not inclined to undo all that hard work and demolish!

  • Anonymous

    Hi,

    We had a quote for

  • Anonymous

    We are currently developing the first storey on our 1950’s extended bungalow using Sip

  • Anonymous

    Very helpful thank you. SIP’s is something else I have been considering, although what you have said about the planning/design time puts me off a bit. We are going to be renting until it is habitable so are keen to minimise this time as much as possible.

    We are even hoping to put in planning permission as soon as we exchange contracts, and then drag out completion to give us a bit less rental time whilst we wait for the decision for the same reason.

    Emma Kennedy

  • Anonymous

    Hi
    I designed for clients an entire SIPS house 3 bedroom with huge loft
    SIPS cost

  • Anonymous

    Emma, I was wondering how you went on with your extension, we’re just looking into a very similar extension & I’d be interested in how things have worked out, especially on the cost side of things as we have the same budget of

  • Anonymous

    Hi Penny

    Obviously we are a year on now, have you managed to get your project completed?
    We are just embarking on a very similar scheme with SIPS etc but are finding the whole costs quite prohibitive.

    Can I ask what the final costs were & with hindsight, should you have knocked the existing building down & started again?

    Any advice/help would be appreciated.

    Andrew

  • Anonymous

    Very interested to see how you get on with this. We are looking to build an extension on top of an earlier ground floor extension on the back of our 1930’s house. We are hoping to use SIPs though your comments about steel worry me a bit. The point of using SIPs was to keep the weight down i thought? We plan to have an overhang of approx 1 metre along one edge of the house and hoped using SIP’s would allow this to happen. We know we will need steel for the overhang but hoped using SIPs would minimise any other steel needs.

  • Anonymous

    Louise, I would have thought that using traditional timber frame construction would be better for an extension, especially if you are having to use steel for supports anyway?
    Nick

  • Anonymous

    I have purchased a 1960s bungalow and intend to extend out and up to include 3 bedrooms and bathrooms, in the first phase of getting plans accepted, all of your comments are very helpful, thank you, look forward to the challenge.

  • Anonymous

    Hi,

    Interested to know what kind of budget you have set aside for your project as like a few others in this blog, I am in a similar position – just buying a 1960’s bungalow, with a view to go sideways and upwards. Budget of about

  • Anonymous

    Has anyone tried contacting a professional Project Manager?
    We have recently completed the knock down of a 1970’s chalet bungalow and and rebuild of a new 3,500 sq ft 5 bedroom detached house with 3 fully tiled ensuites and family bathroom,Large Cloakroom, Family Room, Lounge, Dining Room, Large kitchen, Utility Room, Study and integral garage with fully landscaped gardens and in/out driveway. UFH throughout ground floor, with oak flooring to Hall,Cloakroom, Lounge,Family Room and Study and oak staircase. Porcelain tiled floors to Dining Room,Kitchen and Utility Room. Granite worktops to kitchen including all new appliances(American fridge/freezer and multi fuel range, oak doors throughout. The roof was built with attic trusses for future upwards extension if required, although it gives amazing storage space for now. The Client had a QS cost the project at

  • Anonymous

    My sister has just added another lift to her bungalow. It was timber framed and I must say it looks great. I can’t seem to get the permission here in Surrey for some reason.

  • keelyannb

    Hi, I was wondering how you got on with his and if you went ahead? We are looking to do almost exactly the same as you put down, 1920s, 4 double beds upstairs and in a road where planning won’t be an issue. We were all set to go ahead with the purchase and a friend in the trade said yesterday that it will be so expensive that you may as well knock down and restart…he hasn’t seen the actual property so was just thinking about the process in principle. We couldn’t afford to do that and I was hoping the upstairs would cost approx

  • hazzard.family

    I know this project was from a few years ago but we are about to move in to a 1970’s 3 bed bungalow in Orpington on 1/2 acre plot. Our intention is to build up, be it a loft conversion or adding an additional floor to make a master suite and guest bedroom/en-suite. We also plan to slightly change the layout downstairs to make kitchen and living area open plan and to change to exterior to make it more atheistically pleasing. Do you think we would be able to do all this with a budget of

  • lindsey.davis

    Hi Kathryn,

    I’m going to repost your question as a new Q&A, otherwise only people who have replied to this thread are likely to see it.

    Lindsey

  • ANDREA JORDAN

    Am I being really dumb, where are the responses and the end results?

  • Lindsey profile picture
    Lindsey Davis

    Hi Andrea,

    All of the responses are above yours, below the question.

    Lindsey

  • James Pearce

    Hi all

    I understand you can claim back VAT for a knock down and rebuild but if you can easily modify an existing bungalow to take stairs and a new timber frame floor, and the layout can be made to suit it’s new purpose how can it be cheaper to start from the ground than first floor level?

    I have a 1980s bungalow of about 130m2 and want to add a second floor using SIPS or Timber Frame. I have tried to keep the roof layout the same to also reuse trusses and concrete tiles – I am not too sure whether this would save money or be more trouble than it is worth?

    What is the consensus of the SIPs vs Timber Frame option?

    Any help gratefully received!

    Regards James.

  • David Evans

    You’re right Andrea Jordan I can’t see the full questions or any corresponding answers.

  • Lindsey profile picture
    Lindsey Davis

    Hi David (and Andrea),

    You should be able to see a thread of comments between the question posted at the top and your own comment. Is this not showing for you?

    Thanks,
    Lindsey

  • Samuel Njie

    James Pearce
    Hi all
    I understand you can claim back VAT for a knock down and rebuild but if you can easily modify an existing bungalow to take stairs and a new timber frame floor, and the layout can be made to suit it’s new purpose how can it be cheaper to start from the ground than first floor level?
    I have a 1980s bungalow of about 130m2 and want to add a second floor using SIPS or Timber Frame. I have tried to keep the roof layout the same to also reuse trusses and concrete tiles – I am not too sure whether this would save money or be more trouble than it is worth?
    What is the consensus of the SIPs vs Timber Frame option?
    Any help gratefully received!
    Regards James.

    Where are people’s replies

  • Lindsey profile picture
    Lindsey Davis

    Hi Samuel (and James),

    When deciding whether to know down and rebuild or renovate/extend, the only way to be sure which to do is to cost up both.

    Reading this article on whether you should demolish and replace or not might be helpful: https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/demolish-and-replace/

    Lindsey

  • Post a comment
    You must be logged in to comment. Log in